Journey-Into-Healing-How-to-Turn-Your-Pain-into-Strength

“Pain is a pesky part of being human, I’ve learned it feels like a stab wound to the heart, something I wish we could all do without, in our lives here. Pain is a sudden hurt that can’t be escaped. But then I have also learned that because of pain, I can feel the beauty, tenderness, and freedom of healing. Pain feels like a fast stab wound to the heart. But then healing feels like the wind against your face when you are spreading your wings and flying through the air! We may not have wings growing out of our backs, but healing is the closest thing that will give us that wind against our faces.” ~ C. JoyBell C.

Do not waste your suffering – pay attention, listen and learn from it. When pain enters our lives we must ask ourselves: “How can I turn this around and use it as a platform for further growth?” because the seeds are there.

In the expansion of healing our wounds are transformed.

When the invitation of healing enters our lives we must be fully present, fully attending to receive its gifts. For any distractions, hesitations or procrastinations that pull us away in another direction can only constrict us, hold us back from our well-deserved growth.

Healing always asks us for a change in attitude, a bold, decisive move away from our clinging.

In order to explore and document our progress into recovery (to secure further, deeper understanding) we should open up a Healing Diary to capture our thoughts, feelings, and aspirations –encouraging words that can help us in moving forward.

Your journey into healing starts after full, self-surrender.

Metta, also known as loving kindness, always provides the answer to any questions we may have on healing and the journey into metta always involves the practice of forgiveness – forgiveness for ourselves, forgiveness for all others.

Engage with the healing process, mindfully committed. Allow it to saturate your entire being thereby leading you in a new direction, a new life.

Buried deeply in our pain, hidden right inside our wounds lies a precious gift – the potential of enlargement of our consciousness.

We must rise above our worries and anxieties, the hurt and pain of our lives, the sheer heaviness of what we carry with us otherwise we will remain trapped in a self we do not want to occupy.

Healing needs to work its gentle path through our lives, at its own pace, in its own way, without us trying to control it in any sense.

Transform your suffering into understanding, an understanding on your journey into healing and renewal.

We may have often made ourselves available for others, supporting them in different ways and as a consequence abandoned our own physical and emotional health. If so, now is the time to retreat into ourselves for recovery – to nurture ourselves back into health.

Positive affirmations, repeated daily, have been proven to make a long-term, valuable contribution to aid our health. During periods of ill health, our bodies slow down which means we must allow our minds to slow down as well. Healing is a body led experience.

We must not run away from ourselves, avoiding the full truths of our lives. Be present, fully present. Open up to your resistance – some of our greatest lessons come from this.

A meditation practice is always a worthy resource to tap into when times are difficult, when our path appears dark and troublesome, beyond our control.

“Being cured and being healed are not the same thing. Healing is a much wider concept. To ask for healing is to ask to be made whole, that is to say, to reach a state of well -being in body, mind, and spirit, that can triumph over a continuing sickness in one aspect of oneself. Being healed is to be set free from limitations so that one can fulfill one’s potential as a human being in relation to others. We cannot always be cured but we can always be healed.”~ Una Kroll

At this crucial juncture take time out, slow everything down and seek inner refuge in the quietude of inactivity.

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Michael Lewin

Michael has served as a Trustee of the Buddhist Hospice Trust, been a Committee Member of the Lifestyle Movement, which is dedicated to simple, green living and was a Member of the Gandhi Foundation. A few years ago he spent two years living in community, in a Franciscan Friary, engaging his time with meditation, walking, yoga and deepening his writing practice He has spent the last twenty-five years teaching and supporting a variety of different groups ( eg, young offenders, young unemployed people, children at risk, children with special needs, adults with learning difficulties and adults with mental health needs ). For more about him visit www.michaellewin.org

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    sophie

    23, October 2016 at 8:37 pm

    amazing reading … thank you. I lost my partner 3 months ago and my body has been craving for rest since them – I listened to it – asking for sleep, for stopping astanga and hot yoga and starting yin yoga … I moved work to part time… just been so tired… I have been taking care of myself but also been puzzled by all these physical reaction – these all make sense now., so thank you for pointing out to this part of the healing process..

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